Dorset IWW supports doctors’ strike.

picket

Picket at Poole hospital this morning.

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Call for Action against The Verne IRC – 7th May 2016!

Saturday 7th May marks the National Day of Action Against Detention Centres across the UK. Come and demonstrate at one of the UK’s most isolated detention centres, The Verne, on the Isle of Portland in Dorset. Previously a prison, The Verne was reclassified as an Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) in September 2014, however it remains under the jurisdiction of Her Majesty’s Prison Service. Aside from the its isolated location, which prevents many detainees from receiving visits, an HM Inspectorate of Prisons report in March 2015 reported high levels of violence within The Verne as well as considerable difficulty for detainees in obtaining legal representation. The inspectors found that just 30 minutes of free legal advice was available and many detainees “struggled to obtain representation to fight their cases”. The report also highlighted “excessive stays”, finding that 40 of The Verne’s 580 inmates had been in detention for over a year and one had been held for over five years.

This barbaric treatment of people seeking to remain in the UK must stop.Join us in support of those detained, and to call for an end to detention: SHUT DOWN THE VERNE! SHUT DOWN DETENTION CENTRES!

DEMONSTRATION 7th May 2016- 12.45 pm- 1.45 pm outside the Verne (bring things to make noise) 2.15 pm in the town.

TRANSPORT TO THE VERNE on the day or contact bristolclosetheverne@riseup.net.

For more information about the Close the Verne Campaign see https://www.facebook.com/closetheverne/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook event

Liverpool IWW Statement on the Hillsborough Verdicts

Liverpool IWW

thesun

The Liverpool branch of the Industrial Workers of the World union massively welcomes today’s announcement of the Hillsborough inquest verdict. Finally, ‘The Truth’ that working class people of Liverpool and all around the world have known for 27 years has been officially recognised – ultimately, the South Yorkshire Police killed 96 Liverpool football fans.

For many of us growing up, living and working in Liverpool and surrounding areas, the Hillsborough Disaster and the events that happened in its aftermath were of massive personal significance. Almost everyone on Merseyside knew someone who had been there. Many of those who were fortunate enough to come home physically unharmed still bear the psychological wounds to this day, and hopefully this verdict will give them some peace.

But if we may say so, today is as much about the final victory of working class people over the political establishment’s attempts to cover up the…

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Early April round-up: work, prison, and other struggles

Cautiously pessimistic

While the headlines have all been about the Panama papers and Cameron’s latest difficulties, there’s also been a whole load of other stuff going on. Here’s a quick round-up of news from a few different fronts:

In workplace news, SolFed are currently in dispute with the Jimmy’s Restaurants chain over unpaid wages and P45s not being provided to former workers. If you’d like to check if there’s a Jimmy’s near you, there’s a handy list of their locations here – it’d probably be worth checking with SolFed before trying to organise anything, but I’m sure they, and the workers involved, would welcome any display of solidarity. Elsewhere, there’s still the upcoming SOAS cleaners demo, and the Topshop cleaners’ organising has led to two workers being victimised – if you’re in London on the 16th, you can join the UVW union in demanding the reinstatement of the Topshop Two…

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Crisis of family and friends: Working class experiences from west London

Angry Workers of the World

simpsons argument

The crisis of the family as a way to live together and bring up kids is nothing new. Working class families have always been portrayed as chaotic (missing dads, single/teenage mums, feral kids), but with the housing crisis and austerity things have become harder and workers are forced into new, and often more difficult, living arrangements. In warehouses, factories and other low-paid workplaces in west London we’ve had various conversations with fellow workers about how they live – not that there is much time for life after work. We’ve also had experiences at home, where we flat-share with other workers from different countries. Facing the breakdown of the family and various forms of personal crisis we thought of writing an article about it for our paper, WorkersWildWest. Below you can find material and thoughts we want to use for this article. Please feel free to criticise and contribute!

It is…

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